Chancelloriids Revised

Many Cambrian fossils are simply spines and sclerites unassociated with any body. Few of the exceptionally-preserved Cambrian freaks come with spines attached, and some of the most prominent of these are the chancelloriids. Originally described as sponges by Charles Doolittle Walcott back in 1920 (Walcott, 1920), modern researchers have found that the spines …

The Eurypterida (Sea Scorpions)

Eurypterids were a dominant group of aquatic chelicerates, related to scorpions, spiders, and horseshoe crabs. They’re commonly called “sea scorpions” due to a long-recognised superficial similarity to scorpions, as can be seen above. This has led to several studies stating that eurypterids are scorpions (Versluys & Demoll, 1920), that scorpions …

Tyrannosaurs

I had the chance to skim the relatively new Tyrannosaurid Paleobiology, a research compendium edited by Parrish, Molnar, Currie & Koppelhus, and published by Indiana University Press. Impressive book that goes through the variety of research programmes now happening on the biology of tyrannosaurs, highly-recommended if you can chew through …

Pterosaurs

There is a brand new book on pterosaurs out: Witton’s Pterosaurs: Natural History, Evolution, Anatomy, published by Princeton University Press. Vertebrate palaeontologist friends are telling me it’s a stunning and masterful book, suitable both for the lay public and as a reference work, so if you have any interest at …

Fossil Bone Histology

This is a brand new book by Padian & Lamm, published just last month by University of California Press: Bone Histology of Fossil Tetrapods: Advancing Methods, Analysis, and Interpretation. I have not read it (although it seems like a state-of-the-art book), but thought this would be a good way to …